The Female Condom: Will It Get Stuck Inside Me?

Photo credit: Micheal Grogan

Photo credit: Micheal Grogan

The FC2 female condom (a.k.a. the “internal condom”) is one of the most recent innovations in safer sex technology. The FC2 is the only insertable contraceptive available that protects against both STIs and accidental pregnancy. However, because it is so different from traditional roll-on condoms, many are weary of using female condoms.

One of the most common concerns is that the female condom will get stuck inside the body. Melissa White, CEO of Lucky Bloke, to the rescue, assuring us that it is impossible for the FC2 to disappear inside your body. In fact, she explains, there are many reasons to choose the FC2 over traditional latex condoms.

This post was originally published on Your Tango.

BY MELISSA WHITE | LuckyBloke.com

While the female condoms seems a bit confusing, it’s a great option for many women. We tell you why.

At Lucky Bloke, our mission is to lead you to the land of amazing sex with condoms. With a selection of the world’s best condoms at our fingertips, we’re here to prove that the right condom can actually improve your sex life. Got a question for the Lucky Bloke: Condom Experts? Let us answer your sex education inquiries so you can concentrate on having the hottest sex possible!

Dear Lucky Bloke,

I’ve heard that there is a female condom that you insert in your body and protects just as effectively as a regular condom. But why does it seems so large? And can it get stuck inside my body?

—Signed Perplexed in Pittsburg.

The FC2 female condom, which we prefer to call the “internal condom,” might seem oddly shaped at first, but that’s because it’s radically different from what we understand condoms to be. A female condom is actually similar in length to standard male condoms, but is a little wider.

When inserted, the condom forms to your internal walls and allows for movement of the penis inside the sheath. This is one of its many benefits. One size, actually, fits all!

Thus, penis size (nor knowing what condom size your man requires) is not a factor with female condoms making it an excellent option for those who find that traditional, roll-on male condoms never seem to fit quite right.

So contrary to your concern, there is absolutely no risk of the FC2 getting stuck or disappearing inside you. And you do not need to be fitted before use. There is an inner ring on one end that slips under your cervix. Then there is an open end with a soft ring which remains on the outside of the vagina. To remove the FC2, you simply twist the outer ring and gently pull the condom out.

The FC2 is growing in popularity. Many people like the advantage that condom size is not a factor for comfort and safety. Plus, it can be inserted up to four hours prior to sex, so no need to pause for intimate donning in the heat of the moment. And it’s latex free!

Another great bit of news is that the FDA is currently considering reclassifying the FC2 as a “class II” device. Why is this important? Currently, the FC2 is not in the same class as traditional condoms.

They are considered a “class III” medical device, putting them under the same safety restrictions as pacemakers and replacement heart valves, states the National Female Condom Coalition.

Moving FC2 into the new class would enable invention and testing of new and different female condoms designs. While the FC2 has made huge advancements in terms of non-latex offerings, it remains the only female condom currently available.

As we all know, product variety means safer sex option for all of us to choose and best suit our lives. What better reason than that?

Unsure what size

Are Condoms Uncomfortable? These 10 Non-Latex Options Can Help

Photo credit: Katla Romanova

Photo credit: Katla Romanova

Dislike latex? Your best non latex condom options may change your mind about condoms.

When it comes to condoms, latex is the most prolific material by far. But speckled across the sea of safer sex products is a growing number of alternative non latex condom options. There are many benefits to non latex condoms. As Melissa White, CEO of Lucky Bloke explains, an increasing number of consumers find non latex more pleasurable. Not only are latex free condoms softer and odor-free compared to latex, they also transfer body heat better which heightens sensitivity immensely. There used to be only five latex fee options available. Today the number has doubled to include non latex condoms with more variety in size, lubrication, flavor and texture.

In this post, Melissa White lists all the non latex condoms available today. 

If you find condoms bought at the general drug store too rubbery, restricting or just all around unpleasant, consider these little johnnies. They will be your new token to sexual bliss.

This article was originally published on YourTango.com

BY MELISSA WHITE | LuckyBloke.com

If you or your partner find the traditional latex condom experience, shall we say…mediocre at best, the good news is there is more innovation in the non latex condom world than ever before. A variety of latex-free materials and styles are taking safer sex to new horizons in both safety and pleasure.

Non latex condoms are not merely for those with sensitivities. Not at all. Latex free condoms are typically softer and odor-free compared to latex; they also transfer heat and sensation much better than their latex counterparts. This means sex with them often feels much better for both partners.

Until recently, out of the hundreds of condoms available, there were only five latex free condoms to choose from. And none of these condoms offered any special features such as flavor, stimulating lubricant or ribbed texture.

To further the frustration, most non latex condoms still focus on the 50% of men who need a “standard” size condom or the 15% requiring a “larger” size, while ignoring the 35% of men who need a more tailored condom.

If you or your partner feel that condoms are getting in the way of the best possible sex, I can’t emphasize enough how fundamental proper condom fit is to both safety and dramatically enhanced pleasure when it comes to condom use.

Here’s a condom size guide to help you determine your (partner’s) best condom fit.

The good news is that condom brands are catching on and much of the ongoing innovation focuses on non latex condoms. In 2014, three new non-latex condom options arrived on the scene. This non latex condom primer is guaranteed to improve your (safer) sex life:

  1. LifeStyle’s SKYN was the first premium condom made from polyisoprene — a scientifically formulated non-latex material that delivers a more natural, sensitive feel than latex. Many couples who try polyisoprene once, favor it and do not return to latex.
  2. SKYN Extra Lubricated adds 40% more long lasting, ultra silky lubricant — ensuring that you and your partner are in for a smooth ride.
  3. SKYN Large is the condom you choose if extra width or length is required for your guy’s comfort.
  4. LifeStyle’s SKYN Intense Feel is brand new, launched last month, and the world’s first ever non-latex studded condom. This polyisoprene condom features strategically placed studs to maximize pleasure and sensation for both partners.
  5. Beyond polyisoprene condom options, a fantastic new arrival to the scene is UNIQUE Pull Condom. This lesser known gem, made entirely from synthetic polyethylene resin, is both three times stronger and three times thinner than latex! Clear, odorless, and unbelievably thin.
  6. The FC2 internal condom (widely known as the “female” condom) is the only non-latex option available that works for couples no matter the penis size. The FC2 is also a fantastic option for men who have difficulty maintaining an erection when using condoms. And because you’ll be wearing the condom, it doesn’t matter what size penis is involved. This is a plus if your guy is on the larger or small end of the bell curve.
  7. Durex also returned to the latex free category with its off again on again non-latex offering now named Durex (Avanti Bare) Real Feel. The Real Feel is classic in shape and, like the SKYN line, is also made of polyisoprene.
  8. The final two latex free options are both by Trojan. The Supra Bareskin is currently the only male polyurethane condom. While polyurethane condoms are also odor-free and offer excellent body heat transmission, they do not share the elasticity and soft feel of polyisoprene.
  9. As the only natural skin condom available, Trojan Naturalamb condoms are made from a thin layer of sheep cecum (part of sheep intestines.) Many swear by these condoms for the sensitivity. Others can’t get over their smell. Either way, it’s important to note that these condoms do NOT protect against sexually transmitted infections.
  10. With several fantastic non-latex options to now choose from a Non-Latex Condom Sampler is the best and most affordable option for trying out a variety of the latex free condoms available without having to buy a box of each!

Condoms and lube can be tricky territory to navigate and we’re here to help. Contact Lucky Bloke privately (getlucky@luckybloke.com), and we’d be very happy to answer your safer sex questions, as well as help match you with the best condoms and lube available.

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Latex-Free Condoms?

Photographer Rorro Navia

Photographer Rorro Navia

Researchers at Condom Monologues investigate the confusion surrounding Durex’s only latex-free condom option: Avanti Bare.

Here are some key points:

  • Durex’s only non-latex condom first switched from polyurethane to polyisoprene in 2008.
  • In 2011, Durex Avanti changed and was no longer a non-latex option. It was now manufactured as latex but with the same name.
  • Durex does now offer non-latex again. The new name is called Avanti Bare Real Feel.
  • Always read condom packaging carefully.

This article was originally published here.

BY CONDOM MONOLOGUES | CondomMonologues.com

How many times can you change a condom from latex to latex-free and back again?

Well, if you are Durex Avanti you can be transformed at least three times.

As the world’s most widely distributed condom brand, Durex have a lot of strings to their pleasure bow: offering consumers an abundance of various shapes, textures, lubes and sex accessories to choose from. When it comes to latex free options, however, the company puts the onus on just one condom, yet even this single choice is not without confusion. Durex Avanti, previously the name of their latex-free rubber, is in fact a latex condom. The non-latex option has been recently rebranded Avanti Bare Real Feel™. In fact, this latex-free option has been through a few re-branding rotations.

In 2008, it was replaced from being made of polyurethane to synthetic polyisoprene. Polyurethane is a type of soft plastic; polyisoprene is the latest latex-free technology, chemically similar to rubber latex but without the proteins that cause allergic reactions (see our article about the differences). In Europe, the product’s current name is simply, and explicitly, “Latex Free”. The North America version, however, is not so straight forward.

Michael Gesek, from Durex Consumer Relations Canada, explained to Condom Monologues, that when multinational consumer goods company Reckitt Benckiser took over Durex in 2011 they lost supply of the materials to make Avanti Bare and thus it was discontinued in North America. Recently the polyisoprene product was secured again and is renamed Avanti Bare Real Feel. Besides the (longer) new name, nothing is different about this new polyisoprene rubber. It’s now rolling out on store shelves.

However, few consumers know that Durex did not offer latex-free condoms for a period in the midst of company turn over. In fact, Avanti Bare went from being made of polyisoprene to becoming just a standard latex condom. Yet despite this very dramatic product change, Durex kept the name and package similar to the latex free version- as if condom shopping isn’t confusing already!

As expressed by Melissa White, CEO of Lucky Bloke, this move was irresponsible and “a major packaging fail!” In response, Lucky Bloke listed a consumer warning on their site. It’s unclear what Durex’s strategy was for informing the public about this change. One may assume that when Durex lost supply of the polyisoprene condom, they may have sent a notice to selective distributors with the expectation that sellers would inform consumers. To the best of her knowledge, Melissa White does not recall any advanced warning from Durex.

So, please be aware that Durex does offer a latex-free condom now, just make sure not to pick up the former Avanti Bare and read packaging extra carefully!

condom-monologuesCONDOM MONOLOGUES SexEd, Activism, Storytelling and More… Condom Monologues dispel harmful myths about safe sex and sexual stereotypes that permeate our ways of understanding what is “healthy sexuality”. They accomplish this through sex-positive, pleasure-focused approaches to sexuality that affirm the diversity of people- genders, sexualities, kinks and relationships.
Find them on twitter @CondomMonologue